Tag Archives: children

Hydro and Strikers – By Shreyas Saboo

//This story has been submitted by 8 year old Shreyas who resides in Hyderabad. He had written this tale as a part of  the weekly Creative Writing Classes which I conduct in my society. The kids were asked to write a story related to friendship.//

In 1999, there lived two aliens – Hydro and Strikers. They were best friends and both loved hopball. They also liked to invent things and their latest device was the tracer which could trace anyone, anytime. They kept all their inventions in a laboratory. They also started working on a new invention – a spaceship which they named MP390. Both of them worked hard on the spaceship and were delighted when it was ready.

One day, Hydro told Strikers that even though the spaceship was ready, he wanted to ensure that it was working fine.

“I think I should take the spaceship for a test drive”, said Hydro.

“Oh yes! I think you are right.”, replied Strikers.

So the next day, at the crack of dawn, Hydro set off for testing MP390. His route was from Mercury to Earth, and then back. But alas! When he was between Earth and Mercury, the spaceship started slowing down and even before five minutes had passed, it crashed into a house on Earth.

Black and White – By Jeslyn

//This story has been submitted by 8 year old Jeslyn who resides in Hyderabad. She had written this tale as a part of  the weekly Creative Writing Classes which I conduct in my society. The kids were asked to write a story related to friendship.//

Today is a day of celebration and jubilation. The American Civil War has come to an end. It is 1865 and the 15 year old and shabbily dressed Martha, a black African slave girl, is bidding farewell to the noble looking Stella, who is also of the same age. Stella is the daughter of the wealthy white landlord and Martha and her parents worked as slaves in his cotton farm. Stella and Martha have known each other since they were just 7. Stella used to feel sorry witnessing the plight of slaves at her father’s farm. She became Martha’s friend and began to teach her whatever she learnt at school. Martha grasped things fast. This continued and for 8 years, Stella educated Martha to bring her on par with herself in knowledge and skills.

Babloo is Lost – By Hardik Kasat

//This story has been submitted by Hardik Kasat, aged 12, from Indore. He had written this tale as a part of  “Introduction to Creative Writing” workshop conducted by me in June. The kids were just given a story title and they had to weave a story around it.//

A smart, intelligent and athletic boy in blue named Babloo was playing chess with Julie, his elder sister who was just a year older to him. He was about to win when his sister dismissed the game.

“I am not going to play with you”, Julie declared.

Few days later

Now Julie had begun to feel even more jealous of Babloo. From teachers to parents, everyone always praised Babloo and this made Julie feel very bad. She thought that if Babloo will not be there, then everyone would praise her instead. So she hatched a plan. Her plan was to take Babloo to the woods and pretend that she wanted to play with him.

Babloo is Lost – By Avni Malhotra

//This story has been submitted by Avni Malhotra, aged 9, from Hyderabad. She had written this tale as a part of  “Introduction to Creative Writing” workshop conducted by me in June. The kids were just given a story title and they had to weave a story around it.//

One day, I went to a jungle with my brother Babloo. Once we reached, I sat down to light the campfire, while Babloo went to collect more sticks. As he walked through the jungle, he could smell something strange and he started following it. When I looked around, Babloo had vanished from my sight and I waited for him for a long time but he did not return. I got worried and went about searching for him in the jungle.

The Friendly Crocodile

//This story has been submitted by Rajit Singh Gour, aged 9, from Hyderabad. This is the winning entry in the first contest conducted as a part of the “Children’s Corner” initiative. Children were given a prompt of few lines and they had to continue the story with their own interpretation.//

It was a bright Sunday morning, bustling with the boisterous banter between Sarah and her friends. The children were playing hopscotch by the lake which was near Sarah’s home. Mrs. Rodrigues, Sarah’s mother, was watching them from the kitchen while preparing sandwiches for the children to feast on. Suddenly there was a loud scream “AAAAAAAA”. Sarah thought it was her troublesome little sister who was playing in the garden with her dolls, but to her surprise it was her mother. Sarah ran to her house to see what had happened. She went in and saw that her mother lay there unconscious. She climbed the platform of the kitchen. She noticed from the window that there was a large crocodile which seemed to be attempting to catch her sister Sinha. Sarah ran to her sister who was at the garden but couldn’t find her there. She sat down crying and thought aloud – “what will I tell Mom when she asks about Sinha”.

Vitamin ‘M’ – Nutrition of the mind and soul

// This article was chosen among the special mentions for the month of December 2016 by mycity4kids and is available at below link:

https://www.mycity4kids.com/parenting/my-voice/article/vitamin-m-nutrition-of-the-mind-and-soul

This article was published by Youth Ki Awaaz on the occasion of World Health Day and is available at below link:

https://www.youthkiawaaz.com/2017/04/role-of-parenting-in-raising-mentally-healthy-individuals/

This article has been published by Women’s Web and is available at below link:

http://www.womensweb.in/2016/12/raising-a-happy-kid-tips-for-parents/

Converse with any parent or read posts on parenting forums, and you will find that all parents have a unanimous goal – “to raise a happy and healthy child”! But, I have often reflected on this to comprehend what we really imply when we use the term “happy child”. Through discussions with fellow parents I realized that quite a significant number of us interpret a “happy child” to be one who is not a “cry baby” and who, for the most part, is cheerful, smiling whatever be the situation.  However, is that a reasonable, realistic and healthy expectation? While it may break our heart or at times exasperate us to see our children cry, sulk or express anger, fact of the matter is that life is about experiencing the varied emotions it is speckled with. I personally believe that more than a happy child, it is important to raise a mentally healthy child – one who faces all kinds of feelings head on and learns to deal with them, instead of running away from the inner turmoil; one who acknowledges that life is not always happy-happy or hunky dory, and that it is fine to feel sad and low in spirits some times. I am guilty of having used the phrase “cry baby” in the past but I am glad I have come to recognize that we need to stop mocking someone who cries more than the “standards” defined by us. It is uncalled for and can actually lead to suppressing of emotions by the child leading to pretense to avoid being teased or ridiculed.

When we talk about or think in relation to our child’s health, we tend to largely concentrate on the physical health of the child. But then, what about the nutrition of the mind and soul? Somewhere, starting from the milestone madness to the rat race as the kids grow, are we unconsciously missing out on focusing on our child’s mental health?  This happens all the more in a country like ours where we are still quite nascent in our knowledge of mental health and the importance that we lay on it; where the grim state of affairs in this area is evident by way of our acceptance of mental health issues. People suffering from depression or other mental issues are ostracized or looked down upon. Anyone visiting a counselor or seeking professional treatment is labelled as “mad” due to which many cases are left untreated for the fear of social stigma. This is a dangerous situation to be in as it can lead to suicides and a numerous other grave crimes. Depression, the most prevailing form of mental illness, is estimated to exist in 3 of every 100 in urban areas like Mumbai. As per WHO statistics, the average suicide rate in India is 10.9 for every 100,000 people. While the absence of open dialogue around mental health is a key hurdle, experts say this also adds to the problem of less resources and doctors available in this domain.