Monthly Archives: May 2017

The Day of the Man-Eating Night Crawlers

//This story has been submitted by Ryan Bhathija, aged 9, from Hyderabad. This entry has won 2nd prize in the first contest conducted as a part of the “Children’s Corner” initiative. Children were given a prompt of few lines and they had to continue the story with their own interpretation.//

It was a bright Sunday morning, bustling with the boisterous banter between Sarah and her friends. The children were playing hopscotch by the lake which was close to Sarah’s home. Mrs. Rodrigues was watching them from the kitchen while preparing sandwiches for the children to feast on. Suddenly, there was a loud scream. It was Mrs Rodrigues’ scream as she saw man-eating night crawlers. She called Sarah before she jumped into the lake to get stones. But it was too late as Sarah had turned into a skeleton. She called up Mr. Rodrigues for help, but he didn’t answer the call.

Mrs. Rodrigues ran to find the children as they were escaping from the man-eating night crawlers. Even after running too far, children were nowhere to be found. She ran into the forest of Ghosts following the children’s footprints. Mrs. Rodrigues felt as if someone was following her. She looked back but found no one. Suddenly her phone rang, “tring tring……”. She got scared. It was Mr. Rodrigues.

“Did you forget documents, watch”, she fumbled with words.

“No no”, interrupted Mr Rodrigues, “I was just errrr…”.

The phone line got disconnected.

The Friendly Crocodile

//This story has been submitted by Rajit Singh Gour, aged 9, from Hyderabad. This is the winning entry in the first contest conducted as a part of the “Children’s Corner” initiative. Children were given a prompt of few lines and they had to continue the story with their own interpretation.//

It was a bright Sunday morning, bustling with the boisterous banter between Sarah and her friends. The children were playing hopscotch by the lake which was near Sarah’s home. Mrs. Rodrigues, Sarah’s mother, was watching them from the kitchen while preparing sandwiches for the children to feast on. Suddenly there was a loud scream “AAAAAAAA”. Sarah thought it was her troublesome little sister who was playing in the garden with her dolls, but to her surprise it was her mother. Sarah ran to her house to see what had happened. She went in and saw that her mother lay there unconscious. She climbed the platform of the kitchen. She noticed from the window that there was a large crocodile which seemed to be attempting to catch her sister Sinha. Sarah ran to her sister who was at the garden but couldn’t find her there. She sat down crying and thought aloud – “what will I tell Mom when she asks about Sinha”.

To the Mother who was not revered

//This article is the winning entry for the Momspiration contest conducted by mycity4kids. It is also available at the below link:

https://www.mycity4kids.com/parenting/my-voice/article/to-the-mother-who-was-not-revered-momspiration

Mother – the very mention of this word invokes deep emotions in our hearts. A mother is associated with veneration, strength, unconditional love and warmth. Our society places a mother on a pedestal, but does this same society demonstrate adulation and admiration for every mother who deserves it? 

During my stint as a volunteer with an NGO, I was fortunate to have had the privilege of meeting some extremely wonderful and inspirational individuals. Each interaction that I had with them has been a life lesson and has been instrumental in making me the person that I am today. That was the time when my friendship with Reshma, an employee of the NGO, happened. I believe that just like there are soul mates, there are also soul friends. These are the friends with whom we feel an instant connection; these are the friends who become an integral and indispensable part of our lives even before we get to know them enough. Reshma is my soul friend who is an inspiration in every sense of the word and she is someone who stands by me like a rock come what may. I thank my stars that I got an opportunity to bond with someone like her.

Sexual Abuse Survivors – The Ugly Reality

// This article was first published on the prestigious platform “Incredible Women of India”. Below is the link to the article:

Sexual Abuse Survivors – The Ugly Reality

“Oh, poor thing has been scarred for life.”

“She has become a big blot on the family’s reputation.”

“That is really sad… but she should have been more careful.”

“Why were you out so late in the night?”

“She has lost everything along with her dignity.”

“How will we face the society now? We are ruined!”

“Better go home and forget about the incident, a case will only subject you to more humiliation.”

These are just some of the awful things we say, and in doing so, continue to victimize the victims of sexual abuse. They face this everywhere – in their homes, at the police station, at the hospital, at their workplaces, in their neighbourhood. Through our insensitive words and actions, we only add insult to their injury.

A pimple reminded me of a simple lesson in parenting

//This article has been published by Women’s Web and is also available at the below link:

http://www.womensweb.in/2017/05/teaching-kids-to-be-accepting-lesson-in-parenting/

For parents, their children are the most beautiful living creatures in the whole wide world. But after becoming a Mother, I realized that the reverse holds true as well. Can you imagine someone calling my “Aadhar card” picture beautiful? Well, yes that someone is none other than my 28 months old daughter. Because of the obvious shift in priorities, I have barely bothered about the way I have looked since the time parenthood happened. But, she never fails to shower me with accolades, more so on the most unexpected occasions.

So, a nasty pimple popped up on my forehead yesterday, and my little one was enamoured by this irritating bump on my face. She exclaimed with exhilaration – “Mummy ka pimple sundar lag raha hai” (Translated to “Mummy is looking pretty with the pimple”). Only a child can find a pimple on the mother’s face beautiful! I was evidently amused by her compliment and laughed uproariously. But she seemed a bit vexed with my laughter because she was expecting a heartfelt “Thank You” from me for her admiration, as that is how I usually respond to her praises. I was about to reason with her by saying – “How can this pimple be pretty darling?”, and then refrained from doing so as soon as realization dawned – the realization that I was unnecessarily feeding in the ridiculous notion in her head that a pimple is ugly; the realization that however much we want to believe that our soul is what truly makes us beautiful, certain perceptions are too deeply etched in our minds and subconsciously we pass them on to our children.